composing

A Fun Way to Incorporate Composing and Musical Creativity Into Your Teaching

A Fun Way to Incorporate Composing and Musical Creativity Into Your Teaching

Raise your hand if you tend to leave composing to those required college classes and the professionals who do it for a living.

Why is this? I think the biggest reason may be our own insecurity. I mean, how many of us grew up writing our own musical compositions? How many of us include this as a musical activity in our lives and work today?

If you had classical music training growing up, you probably didn’t spend much time composing or creating. Instead, the focus was likely on learning how to read and interpret what’s on the page (speaking from my own experience here).

How to Write Your Own Handbell Processional

How to Write Your Own Handbell Processional

As church music directors, we talk a lot about music selection: worship planning, what fits with the lectionary, what will we do for Easter this year, etc. Most of these discussions revolve around finding the right piece of music for your group for a particular Sunday. But have you ever considered writing your own music? Let's start with a simple handbell processional.

A handbell processional is a short piece often used as an introit, fanfare, or acclamation. Processionals are often based on repeated patterns (1-2 measures in length), which makes them easy to learn and play from memory. They are particularly effective when played from the balcony, narthex, or while walking in and/or out of the sanctuary.

Here are a few audio/video examples, to give you an idea:

Festive Introit in C
Lenten Processional
Handbell Acclamation on "Azmon"